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Our projects

Since 2003, the Save Our Seas Foundation has funded more than 160 projects that not only research and conserve marine life around the world, but also make people aware of the richness of the oceans and educate those who earn their livelihoods from the sea about sustainability.

Browse the list of projects below to discover the projects and meet the project leaders we have been supporting.

Archived
Australia

White shark population

When the number of shark incidents surged in Western Australia, people panicked and blamed a growth in the white shark population. Charlie is using genetics to determine how many white sharks there really are to inform decision-making.

Archived
False Bay, South Africa

The big BRUV

Curious about life at the bottom of False Bay? Lauren’s underwater video cameras show us which sharks and fish have made it their home. This simple system can be replicated to give us a glimpse of underwater worlds across South Africa.

False Bay, South Africa

Sharks on the urban edge

False Bay is home to one of the world’s largest white shark populations and a growing human community. This creates a number of challenges for both people and sharks. Alison is finding out how these apex predators shape the bay and what would happen if they disappeared.

Japan

Tracking hammerheads in Japan

Our overarching goal is to gather spatial, temporal, and behavioral data on an isolated aggregation of scalloped hammerhead sharks found off Japan that will result in protective measures, and to create a unique public awareness outreach campaign focused on advancing…

Worldwide

The manta code continues

Genetics are a powerful tool in the conservation arsenal. The Manta Trust is collecting samples from vulnerable manta rays all over the globe, and genetic analyses will help us to correctly identify species and discover which populations are most in trouble.

St Joseph Atoll, Seychelles

Baby sharks sharing space

Sharks don’t look after their babies, but they do choose a safe place to give birth. Ornella’s studies young blacktip reef and sicklefin lemon sharks in St Joseph’s lagoon to see how they get along while growing up together.

Worldwide

The manta code

Genetics are a powerful tool in the conservation arsenal. The Manta Trust is collecting samples from vulnerable manta rays all over the globe, and genetic analyses will help us to correctly identify species and discover which populations are most in trouble.