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Reports

Published in IUCN Shark Specialist Group, 9th February 2016
Sympathy for the devil: A conservation strategy for devil and manta rays

Devil and Manta Rays (Mobulidae) are a family of species that are highly mobile, broadly distributed and routinely cross international boundaries. They are globally threatened by directed and non-directed fisheries that retain these fishes for their gill plates, which are highly valued in Asian markets. Over the past five years, restrictions on fishing and trade have been increasing for both devil and manta rays. However, the implementation of effective protections depends entirely upon the availability and communication of relevant scientific knowledge, to those people best placed to take action. In 2014, the IUCN Shark Specialist Group (SSG) convened a workshop aimed at developing a global strategy for the conservation of devil and manta rays.

Published in IUCN Shark Specialist Group, 5th June 2014
Endangered Sawfish: IUCN Strategy Released as Global Protection Proposed

Shark Specialists Prioritize Recovery of World’s Largest, Most Threatened Rays

Published in IUCN Shark Specialist Group, 5th June 2014
Infographic on Saving Sawfish: A Strategy to Recover World’s Most Endangered Marine Fish

Sawfishes are arguably the most threatened family of marine fishes in the world. The global populations of all five sawfish species have experienced historic declines greater than 90% due to fisheries overexploitation (directed and bycatch) and habitat loss. Consequently, three species are listed on the IUCN Red List as Critically Endangered, and two species are listed as Endangered. There is a very real risk that these unique species will be lost without urgent conservation action.
The IUCN Shark Specialist Group developed a Global Sawfish Conservation Strategy in 2014 that provides an update on the status of sawfishes. It also details global-scale prioritized recommendations for meaningful research, education and conservation action and a roadmap for the development of regional conservation programmes to improve the global status of sawfishes.

Published in IUCN Shark Specialist Group, 5th June 2014
Sawfish: A Global Strategy for Conservation

Sawfishes are arguably the most threatened family of marine fishes in the world. The global populations of all five sawfish species have experienced historic declines greater than 90% due to fisheries overexploitation (directed and bycatch) and habitat loss. Consequently, three species are listed on the IUCN Red List as Critically Endangered, and two species are listed as Endangered. There is a very real risk that these unique species will be lost without urgent conservation action.
The IUCN Shark Specialist Group developed a Global Sawfish Conservation Strategy in 2014 that provides an update on the status of sawfishes. It also details global-scale prioritized recommendations for meaningful research, education and conservation action and a roadmap for the development of regional conservation programmes to improve the global status of sawfishes.

Published in IUCN Shark Specialist Group, 5th June 2014
Une stratégie globale pour la conservation des poissons-scies

Sawfishes are arguably the most threatened family of marine fishes in the world. The global populations of all five sawfish species have experienced historic declines greater than 90% due to fisheries overexploitation (directed and bycatch) and habitat loss. Consequently, three species are listed on the IUCN Red List as Critically Endangered, and two species are listed as Endangered. There is a very real risk that these unique species will be lost without urgent conservation action.
The IUCN Shark Specialist Group developed a Global Sawfish Conservation Strategy in 2014 that provides an update on the status of sawfishes. It also details global-scale prioritized recommendations for meaningful research, education and conservation action and a roadmap for the development of regional conservation programmes to improve the global status of sawfishes.

Published in IUCN Shark Specialist Group, 15th December 2016
Plan de Acción para el Angelote en las Islas Canarias

El Angelote (Squatina squatina) ha desaparecido de gran parte de su área de distribución histórica durante el siglo pasado y está clasificado como en Peligro Crítico en la Lista Roja de Especies
Amenazadas de la Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza (UICN) (Ferretti et al. 2015). Sin embargo el Angelote todavía puede encontrarse frecuentemente en el archipiélago de las Islas Canarias, lo cual da esperanzas de poder salvar a esta especie de la extinción. Por este motivo la protección de esta especie en su último bastión conocido es de extrema importancia.

Published in IUCN Shark Specialist Group, 15th December 2016
Angelshark Action Plan for the Canary Islands

Angel sharks were once widespread throughout Europe’s seas, but are now extinct from much of their former range. In particular, the Angel Shark (Squatina squatina) historically ranged from Scandinavia down to north-western Africa, including the Mediterranean and Black Seas and the Canary Islands. Over the past several decades, overfishing and high bycatch of this species has severely depleted and fragmented these populations, leading to this species being listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List in 2006. Today, the Canary Islands is the only place where the Critically Endangered Angel Shark is regularly sighted. However, here too they are under threat and urgent action is required to protect them in their last remaining stronghold. Two other species of angel shark, the Sawback Angelshark (S. aculeata) and the Smoothback Angelshark (S. oculata), are also found in European waters and are also listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. We have reached a critical point for angel shark conservation in Europe and urgently need to secure the future of angel sharks across their natural range.