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Published in Save Our Seas Magazine, 1st June 2014
Alison Kock and the Island of Giants

For marine biologist Alison Kock, False Bay’s Seal Island has become a scientific holy land. Philippa Ehrlich finds out more about her connection with this iconic landmark and its famous residents.

Published in Save Our Seas Magazine, 1st June 2014
Jaws and Me

Photographer Thomas P. Peschak shares his views on the creation of his new book and what it means for conservation.

Published in Save Our Seas Magazine, 1st June 2014
High-Tech Conservation

Professor Mahmood Shivji explains how scientific research being carried out by the Save Our Seas Shark Research Center in Fort Lauderdale is having a global impact on shark conservation.

Published in Save Our Seas Magazine, 1st June 2014
The Politics of Sharks Attacks

Christopher Neff discusses the politics of sharks and shark ‘attacks’, and how this frames our understanding of these events.

Published in Save Our Seas Magazine, 1st June 2014
A short interview with Michael Scholl

We spoke with the Save Our Seas Foundation CEO Michael Scholl about where his passion for sharks began and what drives it.

Published in Save Our Seas Magazine, 1st June 2014
D’Arros and St Joseph

05° 24’ 58.0” S, 53° 17’ 56.1” E
Scientific director of SOSF D’Arros Research Centre Rainer von Brandis relays some of the knowledge gleaned on the local marine and terrestrial environments of these remote islands in the Seychelles’ Amirantes Group.

Published in Save Our Seas Magazine, 1st June 2014
Losing the taste for Shark Fin soup

SOSF principal scientist Sarah Fowler reviews what the SOSF has been doing to address the global threat to sharks and the extent to which its efforts are making a difference.

Published in Save Our Seas Magazine, 1st June 2014
A short interview with Guy Stevens

I have been fascinated by the natural world all my life and growing up on a farm in south-western UK provided me with a seemingly limitless supply of weird and wonderful creatures to discover. I always knew that I wanted to make studying animals my career, but it was only when I was given a tropical fish tank at the age of 11 that my passion for the underwater world began. From that moment forward I would say ‘I want to study fish!’ when asked what I planned to do when I grew up. True to my word, I progressed through school and college with this in mind and in 2002 graduated from the University of Plymouth with a degree in marine biology and coastal ecology.
University opened my mind to the rest of the world and I was hungry to explore as much of it as I could. Having visited and dived in the Caribbean, Africa and Asia, I realised that I wanted to work in one of these tropical destinations, and when a job for a marine biologist in the Maldives came up in 2003 I knew it was for me.